What can you do with neck chops?

tets, Jun 12, 5:12am
I often see neck chops in the supermarket, but don't buy them because i don't know what to do with them. Any recipes out there?

turksta3, Jun 12, 5:15am
crockpot! !

papariccardo, Jun 12, 5:20am
Coat them in cornflour, pan fry or grill them til browned. Brown some onion & galic, then casserole in a can of tomatoes, carrot, celery, olives, water, sauces perhaps, on low for at least 2 hours. As turksta suggested, a crockpot overnight is perfect.

Buonissimo ;)

margyr, Jun 12, 5:21am
hi there, just on the left is a box headed message board, in the keyword or member box type neck chops, then in the date posted box click on the little arrow and then on anytime, then click search loads of ideas for them there.

harrislucinda, Jun 12, 5:39am
irishstew

karenz, Jun 12, 5:47am
I cooked these once in a crockpot, with onion, carrot, celery, tin of tomatoes etc. , problem was that I kept coming across splinters of bone so I didn't feel it was safe to eat them. If it isn't safe for dogs and cats to eat cooked bone splinters it sure as hell isn't safe for humans.

rainrain1, Jun 12, 6:03am
Irish stew

beaker59, Jun 12, 6:12am
I've eaten them for 50yrs and never had a problem, yummy and safe as. Food as it used to be before the world went mad on plastic packaging and sachet flavours.

karenz, Jun 12, 6:19am
The ones I cooked I found it near impossible to get any meat without also getting shattered bone fragments, and having grown up in a house where we had to eat unfilleted fish 3 times a week, with the ever present loaf of bread in the middle of the table to assist choking family members push the bones down, it brought back unpleasant memories. (These were flatheads which have medium through to little almost undetectable bones most of the way down the fish)

rainrain1, Jun 12, 6:19am
I cooked these once in a crockpot, with onion, carrot, celery, tin of tomatoes etc. , problem was that I kept coming across splinters of bone so I didn't feel it was safe to eat them. If it isn't safe for dogs and cats to eat cooked bone splinters it sure as hell isn't safe for humans.

What a load of codswallop

tets, Jun 12, 6:24am
So are they safe or not? ? ?

jubellsrose, Jun 12, 6:26am
You spit them out.

karenz, Jun 12, 6:31am
It is not codswallop or even flathseadwallop, all I know is the ones I cooked had shattered bone fragments, it must have been the way they were processed, nobody else seems to have had any problems with them.

rainrain1, Jun 12, 6:31am
That post of mine was meant to be a quote from karenz. I spit them for sure :-)

glenn-ellyn, Jun 12, 6:36am
I found some round neck chops (home kill) in the freezer the other day. I can't remember what they are called. I did them in the slow cooker with mushrooms and a packet of tomato soup mix. Yummy and not a bone chip in sight.

karenz, Jun 12, 6:42am
So if you spit "them" (aka bone fragments), it follows that you must get them, so why the codswallop comment?

rainrain1, Jun 12, 6:59am
Ummmmm... let me think about that for a while

rainrain1, Jun 12, 8:27pm
Change you butcher :-)

tets, Jun 13, 8:38am
Is there much meat on them?

beaker59, Jun 13, 8:59am
If you actually looked at them from the point of view of price vs amount of meat then they may be a bit marginal compared to shoulder chops but they are worthwhile and tasty and have that delightful texture of well cooked tougher cuts where they are sticky and jelly like. Some are better than others for actual meat content so check before buying.

tehenga288, Aug 5, 2:02am
These bring back memories, we used to have them because they were cheap but very tasty. I still love them because they have so much flavour as any meat does when cooked on the bone. No they don't have as much meat as shoulder chops but they are tasty.
Never had problems with pieces of broken bone if you get from a good butcher. Mum used to cook them the day B4 then take the fat off the next day (they can be quite fatty) B4 reheating

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