Black boy peaches

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Hi just wondering how you can preserve these (jam, bottle, freeze)? Any recipes would be greatly appreciated! ! Would be particularly interested in bottling or freezing as I have plum jam coming out my ears! ! !
I am a complete novice too so nothing too complicated :)

Chef_puggy13, Mar 28, 2010, 4:30 pm
+3

I made jam yesterday and it was awesome just had some on toast.
Found a recipie for roast peach chutney to try someone on here suggested it and I googled it. It is a chelsea sugar recipie.
I have also frozen a few bags pureed and now have to do something with the rest . If I had more jars I would make more jam

Chef_shazza34, Mar 28, 2010, 5:02 pm
+1

stewup and putdown in freezerthen havepuddingsin winter

Chef_harrislucinda, Mar 28, 2010, 5:28 pm
+2

I made black boyd peach jam last year (equal amounts of fruit and sugar, I added some lemon juice to help it set), it was a big hit so will make some more again this year.
I also bottled some for crumbles in winter...
If you have heaps, maybe swap with some different jams/chutneys etc with your mates? ...

Chef_indigojo, Mar 28, 2010, 6:17 pm
+2

I just cut the peaches in half, remove the stone and put the cut side down on trays and freeze them. Once they are frozen I then take them off the trays and pop them into bags, seal and put them back in the freezer. They are great in Winter for puddings etc.

Chef_sqiff, Mar 28, 2010, 8:56 pm

How do you bottle? Newbie here ;) do I just put them in jars and put a sugar syrup over them or is it a bit more involved than that?

Chef_puggy13, Mar 28, 2010, 9:07 pm
+2

Hi Puggy. .
Welcome to preserving. . it's not hard and is very rewarding to do. . there's lots of writing below. . once you have the basics, you'll know easily what to do. . and. . you'll soon find yourself admiring your work. . :-)

I find Blackboy peaches are best preserved peeled - as the furry skin isn't the nicest once cooked. .

Place a large saucepan on your stove, add 3 cups water and 1 cup sugar (more or less to your taste - this is about the same sweetness as tinned peaches are - not the light syrup kind). You can preserve with little or no sugar also.
If you have more than about 10-12 peaches, double the water and sugar, or triple, or more, if needed.
Turn the element on to heat slowly - about a medium to low temp.

Place cleaned jars in the oven on 75°C to 100°C to heat and sterilise.
Place perfit seals, or if using pop-top type jars, the lids of those, into a saucepan of water, so they're covered with water, and place on your stove, bring to a simmer and simmer till ready to use, so they sterilise.

Peel and halve the peaches - they halve fairly easily if you run a small knife blade around the slight dent-line that's in the peach from the stalk around to the opposite side. Cut right through to the stone.
Place the pieces (leave in halves or slice smaller if you want) in a large bowl of cold water so the whitish parts won't go brownish - if there are any whitish parts as some Blackboy peaches don't have white parts.

Stir your syrup as it heats, to help dissolve the sugar. Once you have enough peaches to 3/4 fill the saucepan, bring the syrup to a boil, drain the peaches from the water, using a sieve or colander, then use that to slide the peaches down slowly into the syrup so it doesn't splash you.

Stir gentle with a wooden spoon so the pieces don't get broken, and heat till simmering again - stirring occasionally - it doesn't take long and these peaches cook quickly too.

I use a slice tin placed on newspaper beneath the jars as I fill them - which saves syrup running onto the bench.

Once the peaches are almost tender (they'll continue cooking in the heat in the jars) spoon them slowly into your hot jars - I use about 3-4 jars at a time, alternating which one I pour fruit into - start with one jar so it stays hot as you're filling it, as you're learning.
Once filled, use a knife to run down the inside of the jar, right against the side, to let air bubbles out.
Run your finger around the rim of the jar to remove any fibres of fruit, top up with syrup right to the top of the jar, then place either a perfit seal and screwband, or a poptop lid on.
Tighten firmly, and set the jar aside.
Repeat till finished.

If you have syrup left over, bottle that in the same way to use with lemonade as a delicious drink, or to add gelatine to, to make jelly, or to drizzle over trifle sponge, etc. .

The following day, I wash the jars in warm water, dry them well, then leave them till the next day to ensure they're absolutely dry before storing. If they're slightly damp, mould can start growing, so completely dry is best.

Other fruit - peaches, plums, feijoa's, nectarines, apricots, etc. . can all be preserved this way - there's no need to peel plums, nectarines or apricots. .
Apples also can be done like this - they usually form a thick pulp - care is needed to ensure fibres aren't on the rim of the jar due to the pulp being thick, as fibres will mean the seal isn't complete and the contents will go off as air can get through. .

For berries, as they're soft, I don't cook them - I place them in the hot jars, pour the syrup over and continue as above - the heat from the syrup will cook the berries.

Grape juice can also be made like this - I wash the grapes, place them in the hot jars and pour the syrup over and continue as above. . Leave several weeks before using with chilled lemonade - the grapes in the jars taste good too - this makes a great party punch with ice added.

Enjoy your delicious preserves. . :-)

Chef_juliewn, Mar 28, 2010, 11:20 pm
+1

I peel the peaches, take the stone out, and slice the flesh to go in the freezer or stew, and then use the skins to make peach syrup for pancakes. I weigh the skins and add 1 litre of water to 1 kg of peaches and the juice of a lemon, and boil for 10-15mins. Strain off the juice, cool, and measure it. Put it in a pot with 1 kg of sugar to 1litre of juice, and boil for about 12 minutes or until it makes a pourable thick syrup. Pour into boiled jars and seal. I've found that if you save those glass jars with metal lids that salad dressing comes in, wash them good and rinse them in boiling water before the syrup goes in, they seal very well and the syrup lasts as long as our self-control. Very good on pancakes, icecream, or even cereal for a quick snack. Our blackboy tree went crazy with fruit this year so we have a freezerful.

Chef_3jtrader, Mar 29, 2010, 12:03 am
+1

Shazza34 you may be interested to know that I now freeze most of my jam in ice cream containers or whatever I have. I just spoon out however much I want whenever I want it and it is all just too easy. A friend told me that when she had a family this is how she did her jams and although I was highly sceptical at first I am now hooked. I fill a smallish jar at a time and when we've eaten that then simply refill. A bonus is that there is virtually no waste. You don't have to defrost either as it doesn't actually freeze solid. Sounds radical I know but it's a great alternative method.

Chef_suzanna, Mar 29, 2010, 1:13 am
+1

WOW! ! Thanks! ! juliewn wrote:
Hi Puggy. .
Welcome to preserving. . it's not hard and is very rewarding to do. . there's lots of writing below. . once you have the basics, you'll know easily what to do. . and. . you'll soon find yourself admiring your work. . :-)

I find Blackboy peaches are best preserved peeled - as the furry skin isn't the nicest once cooked. .

Place a large saucepan on your stove, add 3 cups water and 1 cup sugar (more or less to your taste - this is about the same sweetness as tinned peaches are - not the light syrup kind). You can preserve with little or no sugar also.
If you have more than about 10-12 peaches, double the water and sugar, or triple, or more, if needed.
Turn the element on to heat slowly - about a medium to low temp.

Place cleaned jars in the oven on 75°C to 100°C to heat and sterilise.
Place perfit seals, or if using pop-top type jars, the lids of those, into a saucepan of water, so they're covered with water, and place on your stove, bring to a simmer and simmer till ready to use, so they sterilise.

Peel and halve the peaches - they halve fairly easily if you run a small knife blade around the slight dent-line that's in the peach from the stalk around to the opposite side. Cut right through to the stone.
Place the pieces (leave in halves or slice smaller if you want) in a large bowl of cold water so the whitish parts won't go brownish - if there are any whitish parts as some Blackboy peaches don't have white parts.

Stir your syrup as it heats, to help dissolve the sugar. Once you have enough peaches to 3/4 fill the saucepan, bring the syrup to a boil, drain the peaches from the water, using a sieve or colander, then use that to slide the peaches down slowly into the syrup so it doesn't splash you.

Stir gentle with a wooden spoon so the pieces don't get broken, and heat till simmering again - stirring occasionally - it doesn't take long and these peaches cook quickly too.

I use a slice tin placed on newspaper beneath the jars as I fill them - which saves syrup running onto the bench.

Once the peaches are almost tender (they'll continue cooking in the heat in the jars) spoon them slowly into your hot jars - I use about 3-4 jars at a time, alternating which one I pour fruit into - start with one jar so it stays hot as you're filling it, as you're learning.
Once filled, use a knife to run down the inside of the jar, right against the side, to let air bubbles out.
Run your finger around the rim of the jar to remove any fibres of fruit, top up with syrup right to the top of the jar, then place either a perfit seal and screwband, or a poptop lid on.
Tighten firmly, and set the jar aside.
Repeat till finished.

If you have syrup left over, bottle that in the same way to use with lemonade as a delicious drink, or to add gelatine to, to make jelly, or to drizzle over trifle sponge, etc. .

The following day, I wash the jars in warm water, dry them well, then leave them till the next day to ensure they're absolutely dry before storing. If they're slightly damp, mould can start growing, so completely dry is best.

Other fruit - peaches, plums, feijoa's, nectarines, apricots, etc. . can all be preserved this way - there's no need to peel plums, nectarines or apricots. .
Apples also can be done like this - they usually form a thick pulp - care is needed to ensure fibres aren't on the rim of the jar due to the pulp being thick, as fibres will mean the seal isn't complete and the contents will go off as air can get through. .

For berries, as they're soft, I don't cook them - I place them in the hot jars, pour the syrup over and continue as above - the heat from the syrup will cook the berries.

Grape juice can also be made like this - I wash the grapes, place them in the hot jars and pour the syrup over and continue as above. . Leave several weeks before using with chilled lemonade - the grapes in the jars taste good too - this makes a great party punch with ice added.

Enjoy your de[/quote

Chef_puggy13, Apr 1, 2010, 9:08 pm
+1

Thanks suzanna i will give that a try next time. I put the word out and got heaps more jars from family who of course will want some jam which is okay as I have more than enough now for my family for the next year and to give away. It was my first experience making jam and I am hooked have made three double batches so the next time there is some fruit going to waste I will make more.

Chef_shazza34, Apr 1, 2010, 10:49 pm
+1

Mine are still are hard as the hobs of hell on the tree! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! I so want to try them this is the first year for there fruit and the tree is laden. I am soooooo sick of waiting.

Chef_annie1061, Apr 2, 2010, 1:11 pm
+1

lucky things to have them, have not seen them since i was a kid and the neighbour had a tree.

Chef_margyr, Apr 2, 2010, 1:20 pm
+1

I freeze jam as you do Suzanna - it tastes freshly made from the freezer. Yum!

Chef_books4nz, Apr 2, 2010, 3:30 pm
+1

My mum created a wonderful pie made wtih Blackboy peaches. Give it a try it is amazing

Lightly blind bake a sweet shortcrust in a pie dish
Cover with a generous serve of cooked BB Peaches(or preserved)
Make a caramel sauce and cover the peaches
Make a 3 egg Meringue and put on top
Bake in a slow over for about 45 mins
Serve with lots of cream mmmmmm

So sad i don't think I will ever get to taste this again as my mum past away 3 years ago, she aways kept a jar of that seasons Blackboy peaches for when I came home to visit to make me this pie. I live in the North of Aust and don't think i will ever see a BB Peach up here, wish i could think of another fruit which would be as good. It is the sweet sour thing that is so wonderful!!!

Chef_guest-trish, Jun 5, 2010, 4:37 pm

I see this post is a year old, however, have just come across this post, as looking for recipes for my black boy plums - and just wanted to say that I live in Auckland and have two trees, as planted second one a few years ago as the other tree did not do well. This year 2012 is amazing the trees are covered (the golden queen has hundreds on it). My neighbour had some from me for the last few years and a stone from the black boy tree went in his garden and is now over 3 metres tall, also with big fruit on. Apparently they are easy to grow from the stones If you look in the plant centres and ask, you will be able to find blackboy trees to plant. So not completely rare.

Chef_guest, Mar 4, 2012, 11:09 pm

When you stew B.B. peaches with skin on,it peels off very easily when cooked.
I halve then remove stone, cover with water and some sugar. Yummy for breakfast with porridge or cereal.

Chef_guest, Mar 24, 2012, 12:37 pm

Can you preserve Blackboys by baking them in the oven?

Chef_guest, Apr 7, 2013, 12:12 pm

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